class="pagetitle">Archive for 2004

Dec

31

2004

2004 Archived News

*Please note that this content has been migrated from an old platform.  While we have tried to ensure that all important links and documents made it through the transfer, there may have been some oversights. If you are looking for particular information and cannot find us, please contact us.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR SECTIONAL COMPETITORS! (12/27/04)
This year, we had a Sectional Team of 8 (Themi Leftheris, Marisa Sharma, Amir Ganaba, Brian Rogeness, Lindsay Rogeness, Tenile Victorsen, Jordan Judt, and Brian Simm), 5 of whom qualified for Nationals. We are so proud of each of you. Congratulations!!

Qualifying for Sectionals is a great accomplishment. We know how much hard work and dedication it takes.

Congratulations to all of our competitors who competed at Pacific Coast Sectional Championships:

Themi Leftheris – Sr. Pairs – 2nd Place
Marisa Sharma – Sr. Pairs – 3rd Place
Amir Ganaba – Sr. Pairs – 3rd Place
Brian Rogeness – Sr. Pairs – 7th Place
Lindsay Rogeness – Sr. Pairs – 7th Place
Tenile Victorsen – Jr. Ladies- 2nd Place
Jordan Judt – Jr. Pairs – 5th Place
Brian Simm – Nov. Men – 3rd Place

We are so proud of all of you. To those who qualified for Nationals, and for those who earned byes (Michelle Kwan and Tiffany Stiegler) congratulations and good luck in January!!

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR JUNIOR NATIONAL TEAM! (12/27/04)
Congratulations to our 2004-2005 Junior National competitors! This year we had 8 skaters competing in Jamestown, New York. All of you worked very hard to earn a spot, and we are very proud of each and every one of you.

In Juvenile Pairs, Tiffany and Christoher Nahm dazzled the audience and placed third at their very first Junior Nationals! Congratulations to both of you!!

In Juvenile Boys, Chad Phillips skated great to make final round. Good job Chad!

In Intermediate Dance, Jackie Powers and David Sparks made their debut National performance in Jamestown, and skated great.

In Intermediate Pairs, Arielle Trujillo, with her partner Zach Sidhu made their third appearance at Junior Nationals, and made final round!

In Intermediate Men, Brent Mercado and Andrew Huertas both made final round, and placed 11th and 13th respectively. Good job guys!

What a great year! Congratulations to our spectacular team. We are honored that you have chosen to represent LAFSC!

ANNUAL MEETING AND JUNIOR COUNCIL PARTY/DANCE (11/16/04)
Please join us on November 27, 2004, at 6:00pm for LAFSC’s 2004 Annual Meeting and the Second Annual Golden Blade Awards presented by the LAFSC Junior Council. The meeting and the festivities will be held in the Riverside Room at the Pickwick Banquet Center in Burbank, California. We hope to see you all there!

LAFSC wins 7 medals in the 2004 Future Champions Series! (11/16/04)
Congratulations to our seven members who placed in the 2004 Future Champion Series!! We are very proud of all of you.

2004 Future Champion Series Final Results for LAFSC Members

Brian Simm Novice Men 1
Brent Mercado Int Men 1
Hayley SooHoo Int Ladies 2
Jackie Powers &
David Sparks Int Dance 2
Nina Lam Juvenile Girls 4
Ashlynne-Marie Ragasa Juv Girls 4

AUDITIONS FOR LOS ANGELES ICE THEATRE! (10/8/04)
Come try out for our award winning Los Angeles Ice Theatre on October 22nd and October 29th from 6:30PM to 9:00PM. Be a part of the fun and excitement!

Congratulations to Hayley Kidd! (10/5/04)
This past weekend at the West Coast Open, our very own Hayley Kidd won the Richard Dwyer Artistic Perpetual Award. Congratulations to Hayley, we are very proud of you!

PLEASE READ – NEW RULES FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR EFFECTIVE THIS YEAR (9/14/04)
Please be sure to read the following clarification that changes the rules for this year in Junior and Senior short program and freestyle. If you have any questions about these rules, please contact Dawn Eyerly.

Senior and Junior Singles and Pairs Competition Season 2004-2005 (6.0 System)

Please check your programs with your coach prior to coming to the competition. Your program must meet the well balanced program requirements or you will receive deductions.

The short program elements are located in the 2004-2005 U.S. Figure Skating rulebook.

The requirements for the well-balanced free skating program are also located in the 2004-2005 U.S. Figure Skating rulebook. Note that these requirements are BRAND NEW this season. They are also listed and discussed in the free skating portion of this clarification.

CAUTION: in the free skating program, you must not exceed the maximum number of elements allowed. If you exceed the maximum number allowed for jumps, spins, step/spiral step sequences and lifts, 0.2 will be deducted
from your technical score for each element in excess of the maximum.

SINGLES
To be skated according to the requirements as found in the 2004-2005 U.S. Figure Skating Rulebook,
as clarified by the ISU.

Important changes and/or clarifications are:

Senior and Junior Singles: Short Program CHECK 2004-2005 U.S. Figure Skating RULEBOOK FOR REQUIRED ELEMENTS.

Length of the short program for singles
• The short program for senior and junior singles has been lengthened to a maximum of 2 minutes and 50 seconds. (Please note that programs that are shorter are perfectly acceptable). The reason is to allow skaters additional time to perform more challenging spins and step sequences, as well as transitions between elements.

Jumps
• Junior Only – double or triple loop immediately preceded by connecting steps or other free skating movements. This jump cannot be repeated. A double loop and a triple loop are not counted as the same jump.

o Therefore, the skater may choose to do a triple loop with steps immediately preceding the jump, and then a have a double loop in the combination. Likewise, a skater may also do a triple loop in the combination and do the double loop with steps immediately preceding the jump.

Spins Generally
• If a skater falls when entering a spin, a simple spin or a spinning movement is allowed immediately after this fall (for
the purpose of filling time) with this spin/movement not being counted as an extra or added element.

o In this case, there should be no deduction for an added element. The only deduction would be for a fall (or error)in the spin itself.

o However, if a skater falls on a spin and then attempts the same spin again there should be a deduction for an added element.

Solo spin
• Flying Spin: the skater must do eight (8) revolutions in the landing position, which may be different than the flying
position. Examples of landing positions differing from the flying position are a death drop or flying arabian entrance
into sit spin. Variations of the basic landing position are acceptable during the initial eight revolutions (i.e., flying camel may be varied by such camel positions as a layover camel or a donut; flying sit may be varied by another sit position, such as a layover sit or a tuck sit, but the sit position must not be interrupted to accomplish the variation). A Biellmann is not considered a variation of a basic camel position. No change of foot is allowed in the short program flying spin.

• Layback Spin: the required revolutions must be executed in layback position or a variation thereof such as a sideways
leaning spin or a change in position of the free leg only. A Biellmann, while an upright spin in basic classification, is
not considered a “variation” of the initial layback position in the senior and junior ladies short program since it requires
a change in the core body position. A Biellmann position may be used after the eight revolutions in the layback have
been executed, however.

Combination spin
• Senior and Junior-level skaters must include all three of the basic positions (camel, sit and upright) in their combination spin.

• In a spin combination, the minimum number of revolutions required in each position is two (2). In case this requirement is not fulfilled, the position is not counted.

• Combination spin must have only one change of foot.

Step Sequences
• A straight line step sequence may commence at any place of the short barrier and may go to any place of the opposite short barrier as long as the approximate shape of the straight line is maintained.

• Other patterns (circular/oval and serpentine) remain unchanged in description. Please refer to the U.S. Figure Skating 2004-2005 rulebook.

Spiral Step Sequences
• The description of the spiral step sequence for the short program remains the same as last year. Please refer to the
U.S. Figure Skating 2004-2005 rulebook. It is recommended, but not required, that the skater sustain the three required spiral positions for at least three seconds each. Judges for U.S. Figure Skating competitions are permitted to consider the ability of the skater to sustain the three spiral positions and may reflect that in their base mark in
establishing the difficulty of the element. (Note for skaters competing internationally: while not a requirement, to increase the level of difficulty, the required spiral positions should be held for three (3) seconds or more.)

• Jumps of not more than one-half (1/2) revolution are permitted in the spiral step sequence.

• Skaters may perform a serpentine or a circular or oval pattern or a combination of these patterns and must fully utilize
the ice surface with their pattern.

• The spiral sequence must include a minimum of three (3) spiral positions with at least one change of foot.

General Comments: Short Program
Additional elements
• Deductions for any additional element will be taken in the mark for required elements.

• Any unprescribed jumps that are more than one-half (1/2) revolution are considered additional elements.

• Any unprescribed spins that are more than one (1) revolution are considered additional elements except as otherwise stated above.

• The execution of an unprescribed element in place of a prescribed element will be considered as an omission; and an
additional deduction of 0.1-0.2 for an extra element will be taken in the mark for required elements.

• Remaining short programs deductions are unchanged for competitors in U.S. Figure Skating competitions.

Senior and Junior Singles: Free Skate

Well-Balanced Program Requirements for Senior and Junior

The requirements adopted by the ISU took effect for U.S. Figure Skating competitions on Sept. 1, 2004, for all senior and junior events. It is customary for U.S. Figure Skating to adopt the ISU rules for programs affecting senior and junior programs to maintain consistency. The new requirements are outlined below.

Well-Balanced Program Requirements

Senior Men
• Maximum of 8 jump elements (one of which must be an Axel type jump)

• Maximum of 4 spins, one of which must be a spin-combination, one a flying spin and one a spin with only one position

• Maximum of 2 step sequences of a different nature—one is required, but not more than two

Senior Ladies

• Maximum of 7 jump elements (one of which must be an Axel type jump)

• Maximum of 4 spins, one of which must be a spin-combination, one a flying spin and one a spin with only one position

• Maximum of 2 step sequences, one of which must be a spiral step sequence

Junior Men

• Maximum of 8 jump elements (one of which must be an Axel type jump)

• Maximum of 3 spins, one of which must be a spin-combination, one a flying spin and one a spin with only one position

• Maximum of 2 step sequences of a different nature—one is required, but not more than two

Junior Ladies

• Maximum of 7 jump elements (one of which must be an Axel type jump)

• Maximum of 3 spins, one of which must be a spin-combination, one a flying spin and one a spin with only one position

• Maximum of 2 step sequences, one of which must be a spiral step sequence

MAXIMUM MEANS MAXIMUM: For U.S. Figure Skating COMPETITIONS, SKATERS WILL RECEIVE A 0.2 DEDUCTION FOR EVERY ELEMENT ABOVE THE MAXIMUM ALLOWED.
_____________
Jump Elements Generally:
• A jump must contain at least one revolution to be counted as a jump element.

• Jump elements are made up of jumps found in the ISU Scale of Values. These include the toe loop, Salchow, loop, flip, Lutz and Axel and the multi-revolution jumps from these categories.

These jumps are referred to in this Clarification as “Classified Jumps.”

• A one-foot Axel is considered an Axel jump element, although it is not specifically listed in the ISU Scale of Values. It is an exception to the rule stated above and will be counted as fulfilling the requirement of an “Axel type jump”, as well
as a jump element.

• Note: walley jumps and inside Axels are not found in the ISU Scale of Values. These jumps, along with half turn jumps such as half loop, split jump, stag jump and falling leaf, are not considered to be jump elements in the new well-balanced program rules and are not limited. These jumps are referred to in this clarification as “Unclassified
Jumps.” Be advised that these Unclassified Jumps will not increase a skater’s technical merit mark. Judges will evaluate such Unclassified Jumps as transitions/skating movements. The inside axel jump will not fulfill the requirement for an “axel type jump.”

Definition of Jump Elements: A jump element is defined as an individual jump, a jump combination or a jump sequence.

• Individual jumps. Individual jumps are jumps that are not in combination or sequence.

• Jump combinations.
o Jump Combinations may consist of the same or another single, double, triple, or quadruple jump.
o There may be up to three (3) jump combinations or jump sequences in the FS program, but a skater will not receive a deduction if he or she elects not to execute any jump combinations or sequences. The judge in U.S.
Figure Skating competitions is free to factor a lack of any jump combination or sequence into the mark for technical merit so it is wise to include them. (In ISU competitions, the skater may lose significant points if he or
she does not make wise use of jump combinations or jump sequences in his or her free program.) The choice is
the skater’s.

o One three-jump combination is permitted. The remaining jump combinations are limited to two-jumps only.

• Jump sequence may consist of any number of jumps of any number of revolutions linked by hops and turns immediately following each other. There cannot be more than one (1) revolution on the ice between any hop or jump,
the sequence must have a constant rhythm and there can be no crossovers during the sequence.

o If there is more than one revolution between any hop or jump, or if there are crossovers, then the jumps shall be considered two separate jump elements with connecting steps or transitions and shall take up
two of the skater’s allowed jump elements.

o Sequences which contain only Unclassified Jumps, including jumps of less than one (1) revolution performed as part of connecting footwork are permitted and are not considered to be jump elements (split jump, falling leaf, stag, half loop, etc.). As noted above, walley jumps and inside axels are Unclassified Jumps and are permitted within these jump sequences. Remember, Unclassified Jumps are evaluated by the judge in US competitions as
part of transitions/skating movements and do not receive credit within the mark for technical merit.

Repetitions of jump elements
o Of all the triple and quadruple jumps, only two (2) can be repeated and must be in either a jump combination or sequence. A repeated triple or quadruple solo jump not included in a jump combination or sequence will be
considered as a part of an unsuccessfully executed jump combination and counted as a jump combination with only one jump executed. If three (3) jump combinations or jump sequences (in total) have already been executed, the repeated solo jump will be treated as an additional element.

Spin Combinations
• Spin combinations in the free program must contain at least two (2) different basic positions or their variations.

• In a spin combination, the minimum number of revolutions required in each position is two (2). In case this requirement is not fulfilled, the judge will reflect this in the technical merit mark as part of the judge’s assessment of the execution of the element.

• In the spin combination, the change of foot is optional, but recommended for increased difficulty.

• May commence with a jump.

Flying Spin
• Landing position can be different than the flying position at skater’s option.

• During the free program flying spin, the skater may change position and may change feet.

• Note: to be counted as a position for purposes of assessing difficulty, a position must be held two revolutions or more before any change occurs.

Spin with only one position
• May commence with a jump.

• Skater must maintain one position throughout the required revolutions.

• If the position changes prior to the conclusion of the required revolutions (other than with a permitted variation), the
judges shall consider the spin to be a combination spin, rather than a spin with one position.

• Variations of the basic spinning position are acceptable during the initial eight revolutions (for example, camel may be varied by such camel positions as a layover camel or a donut; sit may be varied by another sit position, such as a layover sit or a tuck sit). However, the basic position must not be interrupted while
transitioning to a variation. A Biellmann is considered an upright spin and cannot be considered as a variation of a basic camel position.

• Layback Spin: the required revolutions must be executed in layback position or a variation thereof such as a sideways
leaning spin or by executing a change in the position of the free leg only. Special rules for the Layback Spin: If the
skater chooses to do a layback spin, he or she may execute a Biellmann only after the required six (6) revolutions in the layback are completed.

• Examples of spins with only one position with a change of foot are: sit change sit spin or camel change camel spin.

Variations of the position are permitted only as described above.

• The spinning edge may be varied and judges will note that in assessing the technical difficulty of the spin. (In ISU
competitions, this is a feature that will be noted by the technical specialist in the determination of the level of the spin.)

Spins—revolutions
• The minimum number of revolutions is six (6) for the flying spin and the spin with only one position. Revolutions are
counted from the entry to the exit of the spin in the free program.

• Minimum number of revolutions for the combination spin is ten (10). Revolutions are counted from the entry to the exit
of the spin in the free program.

Spins generally

• If a skater falls when entering a spin, a simple spin or a spinning movement is allowed immediately after this fall (for
the purpose of filling time) with this spin/movement not being counted as a spin element.

• A spin with less than three (3) revolutions is considered a skating movement, not a spin.
Step sequences

• The skater has complete freedom in selecting the kind of step sequence he/she intends to execute.

• Men: In U.S. Figure Skating competitions, one step sequence is required. If a second step sequence is executed (and
it is recommended that a second step sequence be executed to increase technical difficulty), it must be of a different
nature.

• Men: A moves-in-the-field sequence is no longer required. If one is included, it will not fulfill the step sequence
requirement for men, nor will it gain the skater extra technical points. However, moves can and should be executed and will be assessed by the judges as transitions/skating movements.

• Jumps can be included in the step sequence, but must not interrupt the flow of the sequence. If the flow of the
sequence is interrupted, the steps after the interruption will not be counted.

Cautionary Note: Classified Jumps of one revolution or more within the step sequence will count as a jump element. Such jumps will count against the maximum number of jumps permitted in the program.

• The step sequence must fully utilize the ice surface.

Spiral step sequence—(ladies)
• Ladies must do a spiral step sequence in their free skating program.

• In the free program, the ladies may do any pattern or combination of patterns they wish.

• Three (3) spiral positions are mandatory for the spiral step sequence in the free program.

Please see the description
for the spiral step sequence given in the short program clarification remarks above.

• It is recommended, but not required, that the skater sustain the three required spiral positions for at least three
seconds. Judges will consider the ability of the skater to sustain the three required spiral positions and will reflect that
in their technical merit mark. (Note for skaters competing internationally: while not a requirement, to increase the level
of difficulty of the spiral step sequence and their grade of execution, the required spiral positions should be held for
three (3) seconds or more.)

• In addition to the three mandatory spiral positions, short spiral positions of less than three seconds may be included
as transitions within the spiral step sequence.

• A spiral with a change of edge (for example, forward inside to forward outside edge without a change of foot) will be counted as two spiral positions. Sustaining the position both before and after the change of edge for at least three (3)
seconds is recommended, but not required, to increase the difficulty of the two positions. (In ISU events, the technical
specialist will take this into account in calling the level of difficulty for the spiral step sequence.)

• A jump may be included in the spiral step sequence, but must not interrupt the flow of the sequence. If the flow of the
sequence is interrupted, the positions after the interruption will not be counted.

Cautionary Note: Classified Jumps
of one revolution or more within the spiral step sequence will count as a jump element. Such jumps will count against the maximum number of jumps permitted in the program.

Note: Skaters at this level should perform transitions and connecting steps (not just crossovers) throughout the
entire program to weave their elements together. (In international competitions, these transitions will be given a
separate mark as one of the five marks given for components.) U.S. Figure Skating rules require a deduction of 0.2 from the technical mark if the program lacks connecting steps between the elements.

The following deductions will be taken from the first mark when a skater has not met the well-balanced program requirements.

• If a skater exceeds the maximum number of elements, a deduction of 0.2 must be taken for each element in excess of the maximum. There is no minimum for the senior and junior level.

• No axel type jump: -0.2
• Missing required spin: -0.2
• Missing step sequence (Men) or spiral step sequence (Ladies): -0.2
• Lack of connecting steps between elements: -0.2
• Step sequence or spiral step sequence not fully utilizing the ice: -0.1
• Spins less than required revolutions: -0.1

PAIRS
To be skated according to the requirements as found in the 2004-2005 U.S. Figure Skating rulebook.
Important changes and/or clarifications are:

Senior and Junior Pairs: Short Program CHECK 2004-2005 U.S. Figure Skating RULEBOOK FOR REQUIRED ELEMENTS.

Length of the short program for pairs

• The short program for senior and junior pairs has been lengthened to a maximum of 2 minutes and 50 seconds. (Please note that programs that are shorter are perfectly acceptable). The reason is to permit time for the team to execute more challenging lifts, spins and spiral step sequences, as well as transitions between elements.

Lifts

• The requirement of a split position for the twist lift has been removed and is no longer mandatory. However, it is still recommended and will increase the difficulty of this element if performed by the team.

• Lifts must have a minimum of two (2) revolutions by the lady and a minimum of one (1) and maximum of three and one-half (3 1/2) revolutions by the man.

• Partners may give each other assistance only through hand-to-hand, hand-to-arm, hand-to-body and hand-to-upper part of leg (above the knee) grips.

Pair spins

• If a skater or both skaters fall when entering a spin, a simple spin or a spinning movement is allowed immediately
after this fall (for the purpose of filling time) with this spin/movement not being counted as an extra or added element.

o In this case, there should be no deduction for an added element. The only deduction would be for a fall (or error) in the spin itself.

o However, if a skater falls on a spin and then attempts the same spin again there should be a deduction for an added element.

• Pair spin combination

o May not be commenced with a jump.

o The minimum number of revolutions required in each position is two (2). In case this requirement is not fulfilled,
the position is not counted.
o Both the lady and the man must execute at least one change of position (at least two of the three basic positions must be demonstrated); change of position may be executed simultaneously or separately.

o One change of foot (only one) is required and must be done simultaneously by both partners.

o Rotation must be continuous and no stop is permitted.

o Eight (8) total revolutions by both partners required.

• Solo spin combination:

o May be commenced with a jump.

o One change of foot (only one) and at least one change of position is required

o Change of foot and change of position may be made at the same time or separately.

o Change of foot may be executed as a stepover or a jump.

o Minimum number of revolutions required in each position is two (2).

o Minimum number of revolutions on each foot is five (5).

o Concluding upright at end of spin is not considered another position and revolutions in it are not counted.

Death spirals

• In the final position while the lady is performing the actual death spiral, both the man and the lady must execute a
minimum of one revolution (man in the pivot position).

Spiral Step Sequence
• The description of the spiral step sequence for the pair short program remains the same as last year. Please refer to the U.S. Figure Skating 2004-2005 rulebook. It is recommended, but not required, that both skaters sustain each of the required spiral positions for at least three seconds each. Judges for U.S. Figure Skating competitions are permitted to consider the ability of the skaters to sustain each of the required spiral positions and may reflect that in
their base mark. (Note for skaters competing internationally: while not a requirement, to increase the level of difficulty and grade of execution, the required spiral positions should be held for three (3) seconds or more.)

Senior and Junior Pairs: Free Skate

Well-Balanced Program Requirements for Senior and Junior

The requirements adopted by the ISU took effect for U.S. Figure Skating competitions on Sept. 1, 2004, for all senior and
junior events. It is customary for U.S. Figure Skating to adopt the ISU rules for programs affecting senior and junior
programs to maintain consistency. The new requirements are outlined below.

Well-Balanced Program Requirements

Senior Pairs

• Maximum of 3 lifts, one of which must be from group 3 or 4

• Maximum of 1 twist lift (split optional)

• Maximum of 2 different throw jumps

• Maximum of 1 solo jump

• Maximum of 1 jump combination or sequence

• Maximum of 1 solo spin combination

• Maximum of 1 pair spin combination

• Maximum of 1 death spiral

• Maximum of 1 step sequence

• Maximum of 1 sequence of
spirals, Ina Bauers, spread eagles and other moves in the field

• Maximum of 1 additional optional element which can be a death spiral (different from the one above), another solo or
pair spin combination or a solo or pair spin (seniors only)

Junior Pairs

• Maximum of 3 lifts, one of which must be from group 3 or 4

• Maximum of 1 twist lift (split optional)

• Maximum of 2 different throw jumps

• Maximum of 1 solo jump

• Maximum of 1 jump combination
or sequence

• Maximum of 1 solo spin or solo spin combination

• Maximum of 1 pair spin or pair spin combination

• Maximum of 1 death spiral

• Maximum of 1 step sequence

• Maximum of 1 sequence of spirals, Ina Bauers, spread eagles and other moves in the field

MAXIMUM MEANS MAXIMUM: For U.S. Figure Skating COMPETITIONS, YOU WILL RECEIVE A 0.2 DEDUCTION FOR EVERY ELEMENT ABOVE THE MAXIMUM ALLOWED.
__________________
Lifts

• Must have a minimum of two (2) revolutions by the lady and a minimum of one (1) and maximum of three and one-half (3 1/2) revolutions by the man.

• One lift must be from Group 3 or 4.

• Partners may give each other assistance only through hand-to-hand, hand-to-arm, hand-to-body and hand-to-upper part of leg (above the knee) grips.

Carries vs. Carries in a Lift:
Note important distinction!

• Carry Lift (optional)

o A carry lift consists of the simple carrying of a partner WITHOUT rotation.

o The carrying of one partner by the other on the back, shoulders, knees or another part of the body is allowed only in the carry lift.

o The carry lift is not counted in the number of overhead lifts, nor does it count in the mark for technical merit. It is assessed by the judges as a transition or connecting step/move and receives no technical points.

o All holds in the carry lift are unrestricted.

o There may be only one-half (1/2) rotation by the man in the beginning and/or at the end of the carry.

o A carry lift does not need to be fully extended although most carries do have full extension.

o Carry lifts are unrestricted in number for the senior and junior pairs free skating program.

o Teams below the junior level are not allowed to perform carry lifts.

o The carry lift is an optional element and does not need to be performed by teams.

• Carries in a Lift (optional)

o Lifts containing a carry must have a legal hold and must rotate according to the rules (the lady must rotate two (2) times the man must rotate at least one (1) revolution continuously, but not more than three and one-half (3
1/2) revolutions in total).

o Only one of the lifts in the junior or senior free skating program may contain a carry within the lift.

o A lift containing a carry is counted as one of the maximum of three overhead lifts permitted.

o A carry in a lift may happen before the man rotates, in the middle of his rotations or at the end of the lift.

o While the carry in the lift may occur at any point in the lift, to receive consideration for enhanced difficulty, the
carry portion of the lift should occur once the lift has reached full extension.

o Executing a carry in a lift is an optional element and does not need to be performed by teams.
(Small) Dance Lifts- any level

• Small dance lifts (also known as small lifts) which may be either ascending and descending or rotational in character,
in which the man does not raise his hands higher than his shoulder level, as well as movements which may include
the holding of the lady by the leg are permitted in the free skating program.

• Small dance lifts no longer have the one and one-half (1 1/2) revolution maximum restriction; number of rotations is not restricted.

Spins

• Pair spin combination:

o May not be commenced with a jump.

o The minimum number of revolutions required in each position is two (2). In case this requirement is not fulfilled,
the position is not counted.

o Both the lady and the man must execute at least one change of position (at least two of the three basic positions must be demonstrated); change of position may be executed simultaneously or separately.

o At least one change of foot is required; change of foot may be executed simultaneously or separately.

o Rotation should be continuous and no stop is permitted.

o Eight (8) total revolutions by both partners required, counted from entry of the spin to exit.

• Solo spin combination:

o Ten (10) revolutions total, counted from entry of the spin to exit.

o May be commenced with a jump.

o At least one change of foot and at least one change of position are required

o Change of foot and change of position may be made at the same time or separately.

o Change of foot may be executed as a stepover or a jump.

o Minimum number of revolutions required in each position is two (2).

• Juniors: may substitute a pair spin (6 revolutions minimum) or a solo spin (6 revolutions minimum) for the pair spin combination or solo spin combination, respectively listed above.

• Spins Generally: If a skater or both skaters fall when entering a spin, a simple spin or a spinning movement is allowed immediately after this fall (for the purpose of filling time) with this spin/movement not being counted as an extra or added element.

Seniors: Additional Optional Element: the senior pair only may have one additional optional element as described above in the well-balanced program requirements.

Note: Skaters at this level should perform transitions and connecting steps (not just crossovers) throughout the
entire program to weave their elements together. Judges will make note of the transitions/connecting steps. (In
international competitions, these transitions will be given their own mark as one of the five marks given for components.) U.S. Figure Skating rules require a deduction of 0.2 from the technical mark if the program lacks connecting steps between the elements.

The following deductions will be taken from the first mark for not meeting well-balanced program requirements:

• If a senior or junior pair exceeds the maximum number of elements, a deduction of 0.2 must be taken for each element exceeding the maximum. There is no minimum for the senior and junior level

• No level 3 or 4 lift: -0.2

• Lack of connecting steps between the elements: -0.2

• Spins less than required revolutions: -0.1

• Step sequence or spiral step sequence not fully utilizing the ice: -0.1

For Illegal elements: -0.1 will be deducted in each mark
_______________________
General (all Singles & Pairs)

Clothing for U.S. Figure Skating Competitions

• Ladies in singles and pairs may wear skirts, trousers, and tights (including unitards). Costumes must be appropriate for athletic wear.

• Men must wear trousers (pants), but not tights. Costumes must be appropriate for athletic wear.

• Clothing not meeting the foregoing requirements must be penalized by the judges by a deduction of 0.1 in the second
mark.

Allowance for a fresh start

• The two (2) minute time period commences immediately after the referee’s decision has been announced to the skater.
_____________________
U.S. Figure Skating is NOT using the New ISU Judging System for any qualifying competitions in the 2004-2005 season but has incorporated the rules governing senior and junior programs to reflect the changes made by the
ISU and to better prepare its skaters to succeed under either system. The new ISU rules establishing levels of
difficulty have not been adopted this year, but U.S. judges are free to use them as guidance as they assess a skater for technical difficulty. Levels of difficulty and other information for the new ISU judging system for
singles & pairs can be found on the ISU web site (www.isu.org), most specifically in ISU Commuications 1263 and 1284. The ISU is regularly releasing new communications with updates on rules. It is a good idea for you to check their web site regularly.

Congratulations Brent Mercado! (9/14/04)
Congratulations to our very own Brent Mercado who is currently in first place in the USFS Future Champion Series in Intermediate Men – Pacific Coast Section. Great job Brent and good luck in the upcoming season!!!

It’s Time To Show Some Team Spirit! (9/13/04)
This year LAFSC is proud to announce that it will be presenting its competition team with official team jackets. If you are a home club LAFSC member who is competing in this year’s qualifying competitions, please contact Paula Smart at PSAD@aol.com with your requested size ASAP!

Congratulations to Hayley SooHoo (9/13/04)
Congratulations to Hayley SooHoo who is not only winning the Intermediate Ladies Future Champion Series for the Pacific Coast, but also won The Elena Tcherkasskaia Memorial for the Most Outstanding Artistic Performance at Rim of the World Championships this past weekend. What a great way to go into Regionals! Congratulations again!

ATTENTION LAFSC SKATERS – SOUTHWEST CRITIQUE AND SEMINAR TO BE HELD ON AUGUST 27, 2004 – SIGN UP NOW!! (8/5/04)
On August 27, 2004 from 7:00pm to 10:00pm, LAFSC will be hosting its annual Southwest Critique at Pickwick. This is a great opportunity for our skaters to perform their programs in front of judges in a more casual and supportive environment. Judges will be providing individualized feedback to each skater and their coaches following their performance. Following the on-ice critique, LAFSC will host a question/answer session wherein skaters, parents, and coaches will learn about what judges will be looking for at Southwest and common pitfalls to avoid. Skaters will also be shown the forms that are used by judges, and last, and most importantly, it will provide our members with a unique opportunity to ask judges whatever they want. Now is the time to ask those nagging questions! Please take advantage of this terrific opportunity and reserve your spot today. Contact Tony Bardin at (323) 259-8242 to sign up.

Here’s To A Successful Los Angeles Open!! (7/19/04)
From July 15 through July 19, LAFSC hosted the Los Angeles Open Championships. The competition was a great success, and would not have been possible without the hard work of our amazing volunteers. Thanks to everyone for their continued dedication!

The 2004 Los Angeles Open Championships proceeded without a hitch! Jacqueline Bundy, Jan Soo Hoo, Sherri Pellegren, Mary Cohen, Ian Macinnes, Charlie Miltimore, Dawn Eyerly, and Bonnie Taylor are most deserving of recognition in planning this event and ensuring its success.

We were especially proud to welcome so many skaters and officials from all parts of the country.

Congratulations to our two winners of the perpetual trophies:

Winning the Van Valkenburg Trophy for the Most Outstanding Performance of the Competition is Max Aaron of the Coyotes Skating Club of Arizona – Congratulations Max!!

Winning the Virginia Fritianne Trophy for the Most Artistic Performance is Jessica Perino of the Los Angeles Figure Skating Club – way to go Jessica!

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT LA OPEN (7/14/04)
The following should answer your questions about LA Open:
1. The judges will be sitting on the same side as the bleachers.
2. In Pre-Juvenile, double lutzes are permitted.
3. There is still practice ice available on Thursday and Friday evening.
4. There is a competitors’ party on Saturday night – information is available at Registration.

Congratulations to Los Angeles Ice Theater! (7/12/04)
Our very own Los Angeles Ice Theater junior team won the International Ice Theater Competition held in Cape Cod dazzling the audience and judges alike with their rendition of Cats. Congratulations to all of the amazing skaters that are part of our team, and to Danelle Cole, their head coach and choreographer.

Great job team!

MORE PRACTICE ICE ANNOUNCED!!! (7/11/04)
The Friday afternoon practice ice is full, but don’t worry, we have added two more sessions – a one hour session on Thursday evening and a one hour session on Friday evening. Call Jackie Bundy to reserve your spot.

LA OPEN WILL BEGIN ON THURSDAY JULY 15, 2004 – MARK YOUR CALENDARS!! (6/21/04)
Due to the overwhelming amount of entries this year, the competition will begin on Thursday July 15, 2004 at approximately 1:30pm. Please be sure to change your travel schedules accordingly.

Michelle Kwan Received The Last 6.0 Awarded in International Competition (6/10/04)
Based on the vote by the ISU Congress, Michelle Kwan is the skater who received the last 6.0 in international figure skating. Beginning with this year’s international competitions, skaters will no longer be judged using the 6.0 system. Instead, each element a skater performs will be judged separately. In addition, not all of the 12 judges’ marks will count. A computer will throw out the highest and lowest mark for each element, and will select nine marks randomly to count.

ISU approves a new scoring system

By BEVERLEY SMITH
Globe and Mail Update

The 6.0 judging system for figure skating is gone forever.

National skating federations overwhelmingly adopted a new scoring system at the International Skating Union’s congress in Scheveningen, Netherlands, yesterday.

The new system, dubbed the Code of Points, does not require judges to rank skaters, but to award points for jumps, spins, footwork and presentation elements. It was used on a trial basis for Grand Prix events last season.

However, even though members welcomed the new system with open arms, there are plenty of detractors who feel it is being adopted too hastily, hasn’t yet been sufficiently tested and has flaws that jeopardize fair results. Russia has long decried the system, and objects to its use at the next world championship in Moscow.

Last season, skaters were subjected to three different scoring systems, the old 6.0 system, an interim system and the new one, pushed by ISU president Ottavio Cinquanta.

The system was hastened into use after the scandal that dominated the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics, when French judge Marie-Reine Le Gougné blurted out that she was pressured to vote for a Russian pair, rather than Canadians Jamie Salé and David Pelletier.

A two-thirds majority among the 54 members was needed to pass the new system. At first, members were asked to choose from three proposals, including one from Russia and another from Australia that incorporated the old 6.0 system. The Code of Points system garnered 43 votes, while the Russian proposal got three and the Australian two. Six members abstained.

The members then voted unanimously to adopt the Code of Points.

“We’re thrilled,” said Pam Coburn, chief executive officer for Skate Canada, in the Netherlands for the vote. “I’m very, very pleased for figure skating today. It’s the right decision.”

She said Skate Canada will begin training more judges, and will be ready to start using the system at the Canadian championships in London, Ont., in January.

David Dore, a former Skate Canada director who is now the ISU vice-president for figure skating, said the new system will “ensure a positive future for the sport and the athletes.”

The members also voted in favour of maintaining secret judging and the random selection of scores, the features that made the interim judging system so reviled over the past two seasons. And they voted to increase the number of judges on the panel to 12 from 10, while randomly selecting nine. When the highest and lowest marks are tossed out, the final decision rests with seven judges, rather than the originally proposed five. Coburn said Skate Canada was in favour of adding more judges to the panel.

Chuck Foster, president of US Figure Skating, said his association was not in favour of anonymity, but voted for the Code of Points because it believed it was a better scoring system.

The Russian federation said the majority of its skaters, coaches and judges dislike judges’ anonymity; that certain new positions created to identify elements don’t enhance objectivity; that the system can’t be implemented on a national or regional level; that skaters will now have to make significant changes in their training to adjust to it; that the system creates two free programs, instead of a short and long program, and that more testing is needed.

Many athletes last season said they liked the system, happy that it rewarded all of their skills and not just the jumps.

However, statistician George Rossano, who has analyzed the workings of the new system, says it fails to reward non-jumping skills as much as skaters think. During the Grand Prix last year, the marks were dominated by jumps, while spins and footwork sequences made up only 12 to 15 per cent of the score, he said. Since the Grand Prix, the ISU has allowed another jump and another jump combination in the free skate, further putting an emphasis on jumps.

Sonia Bianchetti, a former high-ranking official with the ISU, is very wary of the new system, because she said it has not been tested at events with large numbers of skaters, such as a world championship, or at junior or basic events.

“The system is still under constant revision and evolution and the developers of the system are still making it up as they go along,” she said.

She is also concerned that in the season leading up to the Turin Olympics, the ISU Council has given itself power to make any changes — major or minor — to the new system, without having to consult with technical committees or members.

The rules of the new judging system leave no place for artistry and are like “a plastic bag on the face,” said Olympic pair champions Ludmila and Oleg Protopopov, who were the epitome of artistic skating when they skated during the 1960s for the Soviet Union.

“Even the most perfect, quick, precise and expensive computerized system of calculating [it is not judging] will not save healthy figure skating image,” they said. The system will not decrease overuse injuries or create outstanding skaters or judges, they said.

They called the new system: “Cinquanta’s baby.”

“The new judging system is just pretext … chance for the ISU to avoid the collapse of this organization in future,” the Protopopovs said.

It needed 33 in favor for a two-thirds majority of 49 federations that voted on that issue.

“We fought a good fight, but there is a clear message there,” Foster said. ” I belive in democracy, but I am disappointed that people didn’t see it our way.”

In the end, the traditional 6.0 scoring method will disappear from major international events.

Michelle Kwan, the five-time World champion and eight-time U.S. champion, had the last 6.0s awarded in an ISU championships. She had six in her free skate at the 2004 World Championships in March in Dortmund, Germany.

Check out the following links for even more information on the new judging system:

http://www.usfsa.org/event_story.asp?id=25567

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20040609/ap_on_sp_ot/fig_isu_congress_4

Congratulations to Paula Smart! (6/07/04)
Paula shined at the Mountain Cup Adult International Competition,
held May 28-30, in Villard-de-Lans, France.

LAFSC’s very own Paula Smart skated her way to 2nd place in Gold Ladies II + III and dazzled the audience placing 3rd in Interpretive Masters Ladies II + III at the Mountain Cup Adult International Competition in Villard-de-Lans, France.

Because of Paula’s terrific performances, LAFSC placed 34th out of 64 participating clubs in the Club Competition.

Great job Paula!

Results of the 2004-2005 LAFSC Board Election are in! (6/3/04)
Your ballots have been counted, and we have a new Board of Directors for 2004-2005. Congratulations to our new Board and here’s to a great year!

PRESIDENT: Dawn Eyerly

VICE PRESIDENT: Karen Dillon

SECRETARY: Paula Smart

TREASURER: Michael Cruz

BOARD MEMBERS:

Tony Bardin
Carla Golubski
Caroline Guttman
Jonathan Keen
Ken Taylor

Congratulations to our members who competed at Adult Nationals: (4/25/04)
Congratulations to our members who competed at Adult Nationals

Additions to Website! (4/23/2004)
Forms and information now available for the Los Angeles Open Championships – and more!

Adult Pacific Coast Sectionals (3/22/2004)
Congratulations to our LAFSC Adult skaters who recently competed at Pacific Coast Sectionals!

Paula Smart – 3rd Place in Championship Adult Gold Ladies
4th Place in Masters Interpretive Ladies, Class III

Lydia Payne & Richard DuPaix – 5th Place in Championship Adult Dance, Comp Dances
6th Place in Championship Adult Dance, OD 6th Place Overall

Patty Poddig – Tied for 1st Place in Adult Silver Ladies, Class II, Group B (QR)
6th Place in Adult Silver Ladies, Class II, Group B – Final Round
1st Place in Adult Interpretive Ladies, Class II, Group B

Wanda Gelsebach – 11th Place in Adult Silver Ladies, Class III, Group B (QR)
7th Place in Masters Interpretive Ladies, Class III

Michael Cruz – 7th Place in Adult Silver Men, Class II

Vicki Costanzo – 5th Place in Adult Bronze Ladies, Class III, Group A (QR)
12th Place in Adult Bronze Ladies, Class III – Final Round
12th Place in Adult Interpretive Ladies, Class III, Group C

Sharidan Williams-Sotelo – 8th Place in Adult Bronze Ladies, Class I, Group B (QR)
13th Place in Adult Interpretive Ladies, Class I, Group B

Nancy Vega – 10th Place in Adult Bronze Ladies, Class III, Group B (QR)

Check out a picture of Patty Poddig performing her interpretive number at usfigureskating.org!! Coming soon – check back at lafsc.org for an article on our very own Patty Poddig!

Catching up with Adelaine Polito (2/5/2004)
Adelaine has had a very successful skating season! She placed third in the final free skate of Juvenile Girls at Southwest Pacific Regional Championships (we all know how hard it is to make the final free skate), and then went on to skate at the U.S. Junior Figure Skating Championships held in December. She placed second in her initial free skate group of twelve skaters, and then placed sixteenth in the final free skate. Again, it is a huge achievement to even make the final free skate – there were 36 of the best skaters in the U.S. trying to accomplish this. She is a busy young lady, but I was able to ask her some questions about herself and her skating via e-mail. I have to say (with my copy editing experience) that I am very impressed with Adelaine’s ability to express herself in writing – there are a lot of adults who are not as accomplished; I only made a few small editorial-type changes.

Q. How old were you when you started skating?
A. I was 8 years old.

Q. Why did you start skating?
A. Well, for one, I knew it would be a very good way to get a scholarship to the college I want to go to…Annapolis, Maryland’s Naval Academy. That has always been my ambition from the start, to become a Marine or Aviator. Also, I had been watching ice skating on television for years with my father. The main reason, though, was I used to roller skate (for about one year prior to the first time I put on ice skates), and my roller skating coach had a talk with my father. She said that I had much talent, and that I would have a better chance and future on the ice to pursue my gift. We took her advice, and I stepped on the ice.

Q. Did you like skating right away when you started to skate?
A. No…I didn’t like it…I absolutely loved it! I instantly fell in love with the sport the moment I got on.

Q. What do you find the hardest about skating?
A. I would have to say learning a new move. I say that because it’s all about getting the feel of it and memorizing it before you can even begin to perform it correctly.

Q. Who is your coach, and how does he inspire you?
A. My main coach is Gary Visconti. He is so wonderful because he’s like a second father to me. It’s odd, though, because we have not been together for even a year yet and he already knows exactly how I am…how I work, how I think, and he knows exactly how to make me understand. Also, he tells me what I need to hear, whether I might be shook up, a little anxious, or even discouraged. His experience shows through a ton as well, because when he teaches me, he can identify any and all of my mistakes and he knows exactly how to counter them. He’s incredible!

Q. Who is your favorite skater and why (if you have more than one, please include)?
A. My favorite skaters are Michelle Kwan, Sasha Cohen, Johnny Weir, and Evgeny Plushenko. I don’t think I even have to explain why I adore Michelle Kwan so much, but I will anyway. She skates with unbelievable passion, aggression, speed, calmness, and emotion. Michelle takes my breath away whenever she skates because she has that aura of love surrounding her…and you just know that that’s where she belongs. She skates with her whole heart…and that’s what touches me the most. Now, Sasha Cohen…I’d have to say I admire her for her passion as well, but in a different way. Sasha gives off a sense of determination, and she attacks her elements with conviction…which I hold in very high regard. She’s very motivating, and every time I watch her, I pray, “Sasha, skate clean…Sasha, skate clean….” She’s so energetic, and like Michelle, has that burning desire and fire within her that bursts out like an untamable conflagration. Now, Johnny Weir, because of how he makes skating an art, the same with Evgeny…they jump like there’s no tomorrow, and they have that conviction when they skate…that feeling that you just cannot hold back, so you find yourself nearly falling off your chair. It’s poetry…

Q. Do you have a favorite move (jump or spin)?
A. Two actually…my favorite jump is the flip jump, and my favorite spins are my Michelle Kwan laybacks, and my layback-Biellmann-change foot-Biellmann.

Q. What was the hardest thing (move) for you to learn?
A. My single axel, I’d have to say, because it’s the first step into jumping (the hardest category I believe) and you don’t quite know exactly how to feel a jump yet.

Q. How do you balance skating, school, friends, and family?
A. It really isn’t all as hard as most people think it is. True, skating 6-7 days a week is the mark of desperate seriousness, but I have time for everything at once. I go to school in the morning and see my friends…then when I skate, I see my even closer friends, as well. My family though, that’s just me and my loving father…a few telephone calls here and there…and I’m done. Homework is no problem considering the fact that my father is a certifiable genius.

Q. How old are you now and what grade are you in?
A. I am currently 13 years of age, as of November 8th, 2003, and I am in 8th grade, attending school in Camarillo (Ventura County).

Q. Tell a little about your family and the support they give you in your skating.
A. Well, my mother, two older sisters, stepfather, and half brother and sister live in Oregon with one of my grandmothers. My two sisters and I are unique…the middle child is about one year older than me, and my oldest sister is one year older than her (or two years older than me.) When the oldest gets older, then the middle gets older, and then when I get older, all the ages are perfectly fit! My name is Adelaine Gayle Polito, my middle sister’s name is Azleah Gabriel Polito, and the oldest is Amazing Grace Polito — all of our initials are AGP, standing for the word Agape, which means unconditional love. What’s even more interesting is that there are three of us, representing the trinity. My other relatives are mostly in the Philippines, and some others are in Australia, Thailand, and in Arizona.

Q. What do you think is your greatest strength in skating?
A. My greatest strength is my jumping ability. Then following that would be my spins and then my artistry, which is currently under frequent construction.

Q. Do you feel nervous before going out to skate a big competition? How long does it take for you to relax into your program? How do you keep your concentration?
A. I do feel a tad bit nervous, but I do what I’ve learned helps…telling yourself that you’re not nervous…or in other words, I psych myself out into believing I’m not nervous, and then I don’t feel nervous at all. I just remind myself that I’ve done it before, that this is what I came here to do, and that I love what I’m doing. The moment I step on the ice though, all of the nervousness vanishes because I absolutely love the rush I get when I’m on…when the arena is echoing with booming voices of cheering. Then I realize how much I love to perform. It takes me a while before I settle into my program…I like to be a little winded when I skate because that’s what gets me going. Concentration is no problem because I focus on one segment at a time and take it literally step by step. I force myself to think, I’ll make this crossover the best you’ve seen. That mentality calms me down so I don’t get ahead of myself.

Q. How often do you practice?
A. I practice 6 days a week and about 2.5 to 4 hours each day.

Q. Have you ever had any skating injuries that kept you off the ice?
A.Yes. I twisted my right ankle first, then my left, then I almost dislocated my arm, and then my left hip had what is called “bone-stress.” Those days off the ice may have been relaxing, but they were horribly boring, and I couldn’t bear the inactivity. This was years ago, though. My dad incorporated a lot of off-ice training and I have not been injured for the last two years!

Q. What is your warm-up before you start skating?
A. Well, I first do a series of stretches…then I jump rope 300 or 750 to wake my body up and get it ready…and then I proceed with more stretches. In competition, I wake up early and jog a mile and do 30-minute calisthenics, then stretches.

Q. What is your favorite subject at school? Do you have time to do any extra-curricular activities?
A. My favorite subject is Earth, Physical Science (specifically, dealing with outer space, too). At school, I only have time to do those activities when I am there. Drama is my favorite. I have been with Young Marines for three years now. I am a sergeant and the top of the whole class, boys and girls included.

Q. Do you have a dance or gymnastics background? Do you do anything special to keep your body strong for skating?
A. Yes, I do. I was previously an accomplished ballerina and have been in some plays. Also, I was in gymnastics and reached intermediate. I had to stop both these and a few other hobbies (i.e. piano, rock climbing, swimming [I am a certified Red Cross swimmer], etc.) because I wanted to focus solely on the sport of skating. In fact, I do perform a routine to keep my body in shape. I exercise every morning and night, doing jump rope, running/jogging/dashing, push-ups, sit-ups, and many other things (including hanging upside down and pulling weights). My dad is producing a mini video of all my off-ice training so that he can share it with other skaters. He plans to entitle it, “The Road to Junior Nationals.”

Well, I think that Adelaine is definitely on the right track with her skating, making sure she warms-up, to minimize the possibility of injury, and training to keep herself strong. I also like the fact that she is involved in things other than skating, because I personally believe it is good to be a well-rounded individual. We’ll enjoy watching Adelaine’s skating in the years to come. And thank you, Adelaine, for sharing with us.

Cheryl Prueher

Helen Moore: Life Member of LAFSC (1/28/2004)
Life Member of LAFSC Helen Moore died January 13, 2004, at the age of 92. Born in Detroit, Helen moved to Los Angeles in 1929 and was a student of William Rehrig, who, along with Helen, became a founding member of the Los Angeles Figure Skating Club in 1933.

Helen began her teaching career in 1936 and moved about in the Southern California skating community. Besides teaching, she coached national ice dance medalists Camilla Cliff, Rene Stein and Sid Moore, and contributed to major ice shows and carnivals held in the area.

Perhaps Helen’s most lasting contribution to the world of skating is the Cha-Cha. She invented this dance many years ago and today it is still one of the required Pre-Bronze dances tested across the country by the USFSA.

Helen was married for 53 years to Sid Moore and was the oldest active coach in the USFSA. Donations can be sent to the USFSA Memorial Fund.

Congratulations! (1/13/04)
Michelle Kwan captures her eighth National title in Atlanta!

Michelle once again mesmorized the audience and the judges with her beautiful grace, talent, and determination capturing her eighth U.S. National title, and her seventh consecutive National title. Michelle holds the second most U.S. titles in skating history.

On January 10, 2004, Michelle was all smiles when she saw seven perfect 6.0s for presentation for her free program. Needless to say, she deserved each and every one of them.

LAFSC congratulates Michelle once again.

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